This page and associated MP3 files and PDF manuscripts of the sung patterns constitute Module 1
Play Clips of Chants and Sung Versions of these Patterns (left click or right click/ new tab)

Introduction to the Vowel Patterns

New

Tip of the tongue behind the lower teeth and pronounced 'nyoo' as in the Italian 'lasagne' (feel the tongue rolling off the roof of the mouth) (NB-not - repeat not 'noo')

ee

Tongue tip behind lower teeth and pronounced as in 'free' but keep the lips forward as for 'oo'.

ay

Tongue tip behind lower teeth and pronounced as in 'may' but keep the lips forward as for 'oo'.

a

Tongue tip behind lower teeth and pronounced as in 'path' but keep the lips forward as for 'oo'.

oo

Tongue tip behind lower teeth and pronounced as in 'zoo' still keeping the lips forward.

For the purpose of these exercises the tongue will remain firmly against the lower front teeth and this will act as a 'fulcrum' as the tongue in effect 'levers' the voice in and out of the cone space which can be visualised as projecting narrow end forward out from the actor's 'mask'

Think vertically - as if the voice has only one dimension ie 'up and down' not sideways

The following patterns can be usefully chanted to illustrate the conical flow of sound just described. For a demo of each pattern and indicative preparatory exercises click below. Chant these sequences on one breath-do not separate the syllables. As you move the voice from the 'a' to the 'oo' position use the cheek muscles quite strongly to follow the gradient of the cone and reverse that feeling as you bring the voice back up the cone. You will also find that the tongue arches upwards and forwards as you move towards the 'oo' position and reverses on the way back- this occurs quite naturally when you are no longer using a sideways spread of the corners of the mouth to sound the 'ee' and the 'ay'

Note in patterns 3,5,and 7 the use of 'W' to avoid the glottal-shock on the 'a' vowel. This technique will be used eventually to achieve a soft attack on phrases which begin with linking and 'lead-in words such as 'a' & 'and' & 'every". This introduces he concept of inviting the sound into the mouth-space from the point of the cone: (even though the breath is flowing in the opposite direction ! )

New-ee-ay-a-ay-ee-oo

New-a-ay-ee-oo-a-ay-ee

Wa-oo-ee-ay-a-oo-ee-ay

New-ay-a-oo-ay-a

Wa-ay-oo-a-ay-oo

New-ay-a-ay-oo-ay-a

Wa-ay-oo-ay-a-ay-oo

Play Clips of Chants and Sung Versions of these Patterns (right click/ new tab)